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  • Karmit EvenZur

Laguna de la Janda


Laguna de la Janda In Southern Andalucia in the days before the wetlands were dried, was fed by three rivers: Rio Barbate, Rio Celemin and Rio Almodovar. These three rivers are now regulated and dammed, creating water reservoirs, which control the flow into the laguna and the eventual outflow to the sea.

This wetland area, was comprised of a series of smaller lagunas which joined together over the winter and in the summer contrated, leaving only the biggest of them (la Janda) with water. The river Barbate (as well as the outflow tube from the laguna) reaches the Atlantic coast across a big saltmarsh region which you can see on the map. The laguna and it's surrounding landscape creates a very important ecosystem in terms of habitat for migrating birds, as well as being a sacred site

Click here to see a large collection of old maps showing la Janda.

Here are informative links about the story of La Janda for additional background information :

* The asociation los amigos de la Janda have an informative website where you can read a lot of information about the process of drying the laguna, the current status etc:

* Artist Alberto Lopez's page called 'In the absence of La Janda' (en ausencia de la Janda)

* Good historical review by Birder, John cantelo: 'La Janda, past, present and a possible future'

* Blog entries of geomantic experiences in la Janda

The cave complex of Tajo de las Figuras which overlooks the Celemin river (a sacred river joining with the Barbate at the laguna) contains Rock paintings dating around 7000Bc. Along the celemin and leading up to the cave from the old laguna there were small dolmens and what we recognize as an ancient pilgrimage route. Although there are over 200 caves in the area of the 'Campo de Gibraltar' and the mountain range touching the Straits, researchers recognise a distinct style of rock paintings that they call La Janda style, and it is found in the caves scattered around the laguna. This is a downloadable version of Rock paintings of southern Andalusia, by the Abbé Henri Breuil

Over the last few years, we have been exploring the earth energies in la Janda and in the surrounding landscape. We have been observing the interrelationships between rivers, springs, aquifers and salt marshes, all in close interaction with the Atlantic Ocean. Here is a simplified look at the energy system of this sacred temple complex. I call it sacred because thre are key spots that have a very high vibration and have evidence that they have been revered by older civiizations. As all systems go, these key spots do not exist in isolation, but form part of the relationships and processes of the area. More about this here.


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East Sussex United Kingdom | Andalucia Spain

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